Article

Prevalence of HIV and malaria: a cross-sectional study on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea

Published in: African Journal of AIDS Research
Volume 16, issue 1, 2017 , pages: 65–70
DOI: 10.2989/16085906.2016.1257495
Author(s): Xiangbin ZhengCentral Laboratory, People’s Republic of China, Min LinCentral Laboratory, People’s Republic of China, Dong-De XieLaboratory Medical Center, People’s Republic of China, Jian LiDepartment of Parasitology, People’s Republic of China, Jiang-Tao ChenThe Chinese medical aid team to the Republic of Equatorial Guinea, People’s Republic of China, Urbano Monsuy EyiCentral Blood Transfusion Service, Republic of Equatorial Guinea, Santiago-m Monte-NgubaMedical Laboratory, Republic of Equatorial Guinea, Juan Carlos Sala EhapoMedical Laboratory, Republic of Equatorial Guinea, Hui YangCentral Laboratory, People’s Republic of China, Hui-Tian YangCentral Laboratory, People’s Republic of China, Li-Ye YangCentral Laboratory, People’s Republic of China

Abstract

Malaria and HIV are two of the most severe public health problems in Africa. However, epidemiological data on Bioko Island is scarce. To investigate the prevalence of malaria and HIV infections and assess association of malaria and HIV infections and possible confounding factors, we performed a cross-sectional survey of people of malaria-endemic Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea. A cross-sectional study of 1 526 subjects was carried out to determine the prevalence of malaria and HIV infection in Malabo region hospital on Bioko Island. Questionnaires were administered and venous blood samples were drawn for malaria parasites and HIV detection. The prevalence of participants infected with malaria and HIV in this area were 13.8% and 6.6% respectively. The average prevalence of co-infection for malaria and HIV was 0.92%. HIV-infection was significantly associated with the age and gender. Malaria infections were significantly associated with the age. This study showed that the prevalence of HIV and malaria on Bioko Island was higher than expected, although the co-infection prevalence of malaria and HIV was low. The results also indicated that malaria and HIV infections lead to more public health risk to youngsters and women.

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