Original Articles

Experiences of Newly Married Black Women Staying with the Extended Family in a Township in South Africa

Published in: Journal of Psychology in Africa
Volume 16, issue 2, 2006 , pages: 223–230
DOI: 10.1080/14330237.2006.10820126
Author(s): N.B. MashelePsychiatric Nursing, University of Johannesburg, South Africa, M. PoggenpoelPsychiatric Nursing, University of Johannesburg, South Africa, C.P.H. MyburghEducational Sciences, University of Johannesburg, South Africa

Abstract

We report the results of a phenomenological study on the experiences of newly married black women staying with extended family in South African townships. Our goals for the study included in-depth interviews on experiences and guidelines to facilitate these women's mental health. We interviewed six newly married women (age range 20 to 30 years; mean period in marriage = 3 years) staying with the extended families in an urban South African township. An open central question was posed to the newly married black women who fitted the inclusion criteria and this was followed by probing questions to explore and describe the experiences of staying with the extended family in an urban township. Newly married black women who do not follow the expected practices from the teachings of the extended family experienced victimisation by the extended family. The mental health of newly married black women staying with the extended family in an urban South African township could be facilitated by empowering these women with communication skills to enable them to express their feelings and concerns effectively.

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