Research Papers

Seasonal changes of nutrient levels and nutrient resorption in Avicennia marina leaves in Yingluo Bay, China

Published in: Southern Forests: a Journal of Forest Science
Volume 77, issue 3, 2015 , pages: 237–242
DOI: 10.2989/20702620.2015.1048420
Author(s): Shudong WeiCollege of Life Sciences, China, Xiaowei LiuKey Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Coastal and Wetland Ecosystems, School of Life Sciences, China, Lihua ZhangKey Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, China, Hui ChenCollege of Life Sciences, China, Hui ZhangKey Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Coastal and Wetland Ecosystems, School of Life Sciences, China, Haichao ZhouKey Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Coastal and Wetland Ecosystems, School of Life Sciences, China, Yiming LinKey Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Coastal and Wetland Ecosystems, School of Life Sciences, China

Abstract

Avicennia marina is a typical mangrove species of subtropical coastlines of China. However, little is known about the retention of nutrients by this species in oligotrophic, coastal environments. In this study, seasonal changes in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations, N:P ratio and total phenolic concentration in A. marina leaves during senescence were studied. Avicennia marina leaves had high N and P concentrations but the seasonal pattern of N concentration was different from that of P concentration. The A. marina forest was N-limited as the N:P ratio of mature leaves was less than 14. Nitrogen resorption efficiency was higher than P resorption efficiency, and the concentrations of N and P in senescent leaves indicated that N resorption was mostly complete whereas P resorption was incomplete. Avicennia marina leaves contained low tannin concentrations, particularly condensed tannins, as the leaf extracts did not react with acid butanol. Total phenolic concentrations were not correlated with N concentrations in mature and senescent leaves of A. marina. These findings suggest that the high N resorption efficiency and low nutrient losses play an important role in nutrient conservation strategies for A. marina forests, whereas low tannin concentations have limited effects on nutrient cycling.

Get new issue alerts for Southern Forests: a Journal of Forest Science