Unshared Identity

Unshared Identity: Posthumous paternity in a contemporary Yoruba community

Posthumous paternity in a contemporary Yoruba community

By Babajide Ololajulo
Size: 168 x 240 mm
Pages: 138 pages
ISBN 13: 978-1-920033-28-6
Published: November 2018
Publishers: NISC (Pty) Ltd for African Humanities Program
Recommended Retail Price: R 325.00
Cover: Softcover

About the book

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Unshared Identity employs the practice of posthumous paternity in Ilupeju-Ekiti, a Yoruba-speaking community in Nigeria, to explore endogenous African ways of being and meaning-making that are believed to have declined when the Yoruba and other groups constituting present-day Nigeria were preyed upon by European colonialism and Westernisation. However, the author’s fieldwork for this book uncovered evidence of the resilience of Africa’s endogenous epistemologies. 

Drawing on a range of disciplines, from anthropology to literature, the author lays bare the hypocrisy underlying the ways in which dominant Western ideals of being and belonging are globalised or proliferated, while those that are unorthodox or non-Western (Yoruba and African in this case) are pathologised, subordinated and perceived as repugnant.

At a time when the issues of decolonisation and African epistemologies are topical across the African continent, this book is a timely contribution to the potential revival of those values and practices that make Africans African.

Reviewer’s Comments

The overall merit of the study is in the rich empirical content on contemporary practices of posthumous paternity and perceptions and lived experiences of and challenges confronting the resultant offspring among the Yoruba caught betwixt and between the attractions of neoliberal notions of individual autonomy on the one hand and resilient collectivism on the other. – Professor Francis B Nyamnjoh, Department of Anthropology, University of Cape Town

Part of the African Humanities Series

About the Authors

Dr Babajide Ololajulo is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria. His research interests cover politics of identity, heritage and memory, and the political economy of oil exploration in Nigeria.

Contents

Chapter 1        Yoruba interconnections, colonial encounters, and epistemological crises

Chapter 2        The fated grass: Self-representation and identity construction

Chapter 3        Posthumous offspring and the politics of legitimacy

Chapter 4        Endogenous values, spatial delineation and cultural authenticity

Chapter 5        Neo-repugnancy: Assisted reproduction as an obscenity

Chapter 6        Beyond ‘epistemicide’: Reclaiming humanity for Africa

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