Articles by Author: Nb Richoux

Search results for Nb Richoux

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  1. Stable isotope evidence of food web connectivity by a top predatory fish (<em>Argyrosomus japonicus</em>: Sciaenidae: Teleostei) in the Kowie Estuary, South Africa

    Stable isotope evidence of food web connectivity by a top predatory fish (<em>Argyrosomus japonicus</em>: Sciaenidae: Teleostei) in the Kowie Estuary, South Africa

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: African Journal of Marine Science
    In this study, food web connectivity within the Kowie Estuary on the south-east coast of South Africa was evidenced by the trophic behaviour of the predominantly piscivorous Argyrosomus japonicus. We examined stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) in...
  2. Culture environment and hatchery of origin influence growth, condition and feeding organ morphology in the Pacific oyster <em>Crassostrea gigas</em> in South Africa

    Culture environment and hatchery of origin influence growth, condition and feeding organ morphology in the Pacific oyster <em>Crassostrea gigas</em> in South Africa

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: African Journal of Marine Science
    South Africa lacks a commercial oyster hatchery. To inform the sourcing of seed for future hatchery establishments, we compared half-sib Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas cohorts from hatcheries in Namibia and Chile. We measured oyster growth, mortality, condition and feeding organ...
  3. Trophic relationships of hake (<em>Merluccius capensis</em> and <em>M. paradoxus</em>) and sharks (<em>Centrophorus squamosus</em>, <em>Deania calcea</em> and <em>D. profundorum</em>) in the Northern (Namibia) Benguela Current region

    Trophic relationships of hake (<em>Merluccius capensis</em> and <em>M. paradoxus</em>) and sharks (<em>Centrophorus squamosus</em>, <em>Deania calcea</em> and <em>D. profundorum</em>) in the Northern (Namibia) Benguela Current region

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: African Zoology
    The trophic relationships of two hake species (Merluccius capensis and M. paradoxus) and three shark species (Centrophorus squamosus, Deania calcea and D. profundorum) were investigated using nitrogen and carbon stable isotope signatures (δ15N and δ13C) of their muscle tissues. The...
  4. Characterisation of the dietary relationships of two sympatric hake species, <em>Merluccius capensis</em> and <em>M. paradoxus</em>, in the northern Benguela region using fatty acid profiles

    Characterisation of the dietary relationships of two sympatric hake species, <em>Merluccius capensis</em> and <em>M. paradoxus</em>, in the northern Benguela region using fatty acid profiles

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: African Journal of Marine Science
    The two sympatric species of Cape hake, Merluccius capensis and M. paradoxus, have been the main targets of bottom-trawl fisheries off Namibia for several decades. The feeding ecology of these hakes has been studied mainly using stomach content analyses and...
  5. Seasonal population dynamics and energy consumption by waterbirds in a small temperate estuary

    Seasonal population dynamics and energy consumption by waterbirds in a small temperate estuary

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: Ostrich: Journal of African Ornithology
    Simple measures of population dynamics and energy consumption can provide baseline information on the role of consumers in food webs, particularly for cryptic or highly-mobile species of waterbirds. We provide estimates of the seasonal population dynamics and energy consumption of...
  6. Macroinvertebrate functional organisation along the longitudinal gradient of an austral temperate river

    Macroinvertebrate functional organisation along the longitudinal gradient of an austral temperate river

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: African Zoology
    The Kowie River, a relatively pristine system in South Africa, was sampled on four occasions over one year to determine if relative abundances of functional feeding groups (FFGs) of invertebrates changed along the longitudinal gradient, and if these changes matched...
  7. Protected nearshore shallow and deep subtidal rocky reef communities differ in their trophic diversity but not their nutritional condition

    Protected nearshore shallow and deep subtidal rocky reef communities differ in their trophic diversity but not their nutritional condition

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: African Journal of Marine Science
    Large physical changes that alter reef macrobenthos and fish assemblages occur with increasing depth, so the biological processes that regulate communities at different depths are expected to diverge. We used analyses of stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) and fatty acids...