Articles by Author: M J Wingfield

Search results for M J Wingfield

We found 53 results for you
  1. A List of <em>Eucalyptus</em> Leaf Fungi and their Potential Importance to South African Forestry

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: South African Forestry Journal
    Fungi reported from Eucalyptus leaves are tabulated, giving their host species and world geographic distribution. A brief evaluation IS made of the status of the fungi, and also of recent trends in Eucalyptus leaf pathology.
  2. Infection Studies with <em>Phaeoseptoria eucalypti</em> and <em>Coniothyrium ovatum</em> on <em>Eucalyptus</em> spp.

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: South African Forestry Journal
    Phaeoseptoria eucalypti and Coniothyrium ovatum have recently been associated with leaf lesions on Eucalyptus spp. in South Africa. P. eucalypti caused severe defoliation of E. camaldulensis and E. grandis, prominent lesions on shoots of E. camaldulensis, and retarded the growth...
  3. <em>Cryphonectria</em> Canker of <em>Eucalyptus</em>, an Important Disease in Plantation Forestry in South Africa.

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: South African Forestry Journal
    Cryphonectria cubensis, one of a notorious group of canker pathogens of trees and the cause of a serious disease of Eucalyptus, has recently been found in South Africa for the first time. This review provides the first compilation of the...
  4. Phaeoseptoria Leaf Spot of <em>Eucalyptus</em> in South Africa

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: South African Forestry Journal
    Phaeoseptoria eucalypti is one of the more important leaf pathogens of Eucalyptus spp. in South Africa. It is capable of causing complete defoliation of an entire plantation and the death of seedlings. This paper reviews the available literature on the...
  5. Shoot and Needle Diseases of <em>Pinus</em> spp. in South Africa

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: South African Forestry Journal
    Fungi associated with needle and shoot diseases of Pinus spp. in South Africa were surveyed. Sphaeropsis sapinea caused shoot die-back of trees and seedlings of numerous pine species while Colletotrichum acutatum caused similar symptoms on seedlings of P. radiata. Dothistroma...
  6. The Genera <em>Cylindrocladium</em> and <em>Cylindrocladiella</em> in South Africa, with Special Reference to Forest Nurseries

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: South African Forestry Journal
    Species of Cylindrocladium and Cylindrocladiella are widely distributed throughout the world and are known to be Important pathogens of numerous angiosperm and gymnosperm hosts. Several species are notorious pathogens in nurseries, and have frequently been found on tree genera such...
  7. Fungal Pathogens in <em>Pinus</em> and <em>Eucalyptus</em> Seedling Nurseries in South Africa: A Review

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: South African Forestry Journal
    Fungal diseases are responsible for severe losses of Pinus and Eucalyptus seedlings in South African forest nurseries. Pathogens such as Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani, Phytophthora cinnamomi, Cylindrocladium scoparium and Colletotrichum spp. are commonly associated with disease symptoms. Control...
  8. A Review of <em>Lasiodiplodia theobromae</em> with Particular Reference to its Occurrence on Coniferous Seeds

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: South African Forestry Journal
    The fungal pathogen Lasiodiplodia theobromae has been associated with numerous plant diseases on a wide variety of hosts. Conifers seem to be particularly susceptible to infection, although the true parasitic status of the fungus is still largely unresolved. In South...
  9. RAPD-fingerprinting to Identify <em>Eucalyptus grandis</em> Clones

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: South African Forestry Journal
    DNA was isolated from 12 clones of Eucalyptus grandis, and subsequently amplified with arbitrary primers (RAPD-PCR). It was possible to distinguish between the different clones on the basis of the resultant fingerprints. We conclude that the RAPD technique is suited...