Original Articles

Prevalence of Dating Violence and Socioeconomic Status


Abstract

The study examined the prevalence of dating violence and its association with family-of-origin socioeconomic status among a sample of 253 undergraduate students (135 women and 118 men). Participants ranged in age from 18 to 25 years old, were unmarried, were involved in a heterosexual dating relationship or had been involved in one such relationship in the past. Participants completed the Conflict Tactics Scales (CTS2) and a questionnaire which used family-of-origin income, parental level of education, and parental marital status as indicators for family-of-origin socioeconomic status. Descriptive statistical analysis were used to determine the prevalence of dating violence perpetration and to assess the extent to which dating violence perpetration was associated with family-of-origin socioeconomic status. Findings revealed that dating violence was a fairly common occurrence among the participants, and with perpetration having occurred in the preceding year. Women and men were almost similar in the proportion who had physically assaulted a dating partner. Contrary to expectations, there was no significant relationship between family-of-origin socioeconomic status and dating violence perpetration

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