Original Articles

Exploring the Impact of Self-Directed Team Learning in an Air Traffic Control Environment

Published in: Journal of Psychology in Africa
Volume 20, issue 1, 2010 , pages: 135–141
DOI: 10.1080/14330237.2010.10820354
Author(s): Jacobus G. MareeUniversity of Pretoria,, Christiaan G. JoubertUniversity of Pretoria,, Mike van der LindeUniversity of Pretoria,, Paul J. van StadenUniversity of Pretoria,

Abstract

Experienced military air traffic controllers (25 respondents, males = 15, females = 10, years of experience = less than one year = 5 respondents, more than one year but less than three years = 11 respondents and more than three years = 9 respondents) participated in this study to determine whether self-directed team learning exists within their air traffic control teams and to understand the impact of self-directed team learning on the air traffic control work environment. Data on self-directed team learning and learning approaches were collected using a Self-directed Team Learning Questionnaire (SDTLQ) and a Learning Approaches Questionnaire (LAQ). These data were analysed using an inductive reasoning mode for qualitative data analysis and quantitative data analysis followed a supporting deductive reasoning mode. Triangulation as a technique was used to determine whether multiple sources of data agreed and to obtain better, cross-checked insights (Burgess, 1985). Results revealed that these air traffic controllers and air traffic control teams investigated in the study do indeed function within self-directed working, training and learning environments. The quality of team performance was influenced by self-directed team learning initiatives. Furthermore, the quality of self-directed team learning relied upon the effectiveness of air traffic control team performances.

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