Article

Social determinants of subjective well-being among young adults living in the Eastern Cape, South Africa

Published in: Journal of Psychology in Africa
Volume 28, issue 4, 2018 , pages: 284–290
DOI: 10.1080/14330237.2018.1509515
Author(s): David MortonDepartment of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, South Africa, Dalena van RooyenDepartment of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, South Africa, Danie VenterDepartment of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, South Africa, Lena AnderssonDepartment of Social Work, Faculty of Social Sciences, Sweden

Abstract

We investigated the relationships between certain social determinants (age, gender, marital status, education, income, and employment) and subjective well-being (SWB) in a young adult population in the Eastern Cape Province in South Africa. The participants consisted of 977 persons aged 18 to 40 years living in the historically deprived Eastern Cape, South Africa (females = 48%; age range = 18 to 40; rural dwellers = 15%). We measured their SWB utilising the World Health Organization (Ten) Well-Being Scale. Results following analysis of variance showed that age, education, and income were predictors of SWB. Higher SWB was associated with being older, having a higher level of formal education, and having a higher level of income. However, employment status did not have a significant relationship with SWB, suggesting the relative importance of other social indicators of social functioning in this population.

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