Articles by Author: Thabo Ditsele

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  1. Why not use Sepitori to enrich the vocabularies of Setswana and Sepedi?

    Why not use Sepitori to enrich the vocabularies of Setswana and Sepedi?

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies
    According to Census 2011, six official languages of South Africa experienced negative growth in a 10-year period (2001–2011), and all of them are Black South African languages (BSALs).1 The remaining five languages experienced positive growth. According to Webb (2010), urban...
  2. Language contact in African urban settings: The case of Sepitori in Tshwane

    Language contact in African urban settings: The case of Sepitori in Tshwane

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: South African Journal of African Languages
    There is undisputed evidence that the use of so-called non-standard varieties of language in South Africa is on the increase, and serves as an important communication bridge for a supranation that has many people of different ethnicities living side-by-side in...
  3. Attitudes held by Setswana L1-speaking university students toward their L1: New variables

    Attitudes held by Setswana L1-speaking university students toward their L1: New variables

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: South African Journal of African Languages
    The aim of this survey was to establish the attitudes held by South African Setswana L1-speaking university students toward their L1, as no survey has up to date been conducted exclusively among university students whose L1 is Setswana, whether in...
  4. The promotion of Setswana through hip hop and <em>motswakolistas</em>

    The promotion of Setswana through hip hop and <em>motswakolistas</em>

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: Journal of the Musical Arts in Africa
    Many South African music genres, such as bubblegum, kwaito and local Afro-pop, originate in Johannesburg and mainly use ‘Jozi Sotho’ or ‘Jozi Zulu’. These two varieties are used as lingua francas in greater Johannesburg and thus reasonably have more ethno-linguistic...