Articles by Author: Ryan J Daniels

Search results for Ryan J Daniels

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  1. Characterisation of microsatellite markers in the Spotted Sand Lizard (<em>Pedioplanis lineoocellata</em>) shows low levels of inbreeding and moderate genetic diversity on a small spatial scale

    Characterisation of microsatellite markers in the Spotted Sand Lizard (<em>Pedioplanis lineoocellata</em>) shows low levels of inbreeding and moderate genetic diversity on a small spatial scale

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: African Journal of Herpetology
    Population genetic methods can be useful for understanding spatial genetic patterns, gene flow and diversity. While genetic markers such as gene sequences are useful for understanding broad scale phylogeographic patterns, microsatellite markers allow for inferences within species and on smaller...
  2. Analysis of genetic diversity in Rose’s mountain toadlet (<em>Capensibufo rosei</em>) using novel microsatellite markers

    Analysis of genetic diversity in Rose’s mountain toadlet (<em>Capensibufo rosei</em>) using novel microsatellite markers

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: African Journal of Herpetology
    On the Cape Peninsula, Capensibufo rosei is known from only two isolated breeding populations within Table Mountain National Park. Because of its declining state, there is an urgent need to understand the genetic diversity, population structure and patterns of movement...
  3. Genetic diversity and differentiation of the Western Leopard Toad (<em>Sclerophrys pantherina</em>) based on mitochondrial and microsatellite markers

    Genetic diversity and differentiation of the Western Leopard Toad (<em>Sclerophrys pantherina</em>) based on mitochondrial and microsatellite markers

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: African Journal of Herpetology
    Intraspecific genetic diversity provides the basis for evolutionary change and is therefore considered the most fundamental level of biodiversity. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and microsatellite loci are the markers most typically used in population-level studies; however, their patterns of genetic variation...
  4. Improving the isolation of actinomycetes from soil by high-speed homogenization

    Improving the isolation of actinomycetes from soil by high-speed homogenization

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: South African Journal of Plant and Soil
    Quantitative isolation of actinomycetes from five South African soils with different physical and chemical properties was conducted by hammer-mill comminution followed by high-speed liquid homogenization of resultant soil particles using a shaft homogenizer. Soil homogenates were serially diluted and plated...
  5. Seabird bycatch by tuna longline fisheries off southern Africa, 1998–2000

    Seabird bycatch by tuna longline fisheries off southern Africa, 1998–2000

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: South African Journal of Marine Science
    The incidental mortality of seabirds in tuna longline fisheries is estimated for the continental South African Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). Fishery observers accompanied 13 fishing trips and observed 108 sets (143 260 hooks) during the period 1998–2000. Despite most lines...
  6. Observer precision and bird conspicuousness during counts of birds at sea

    Observer precision and bird conspicuousness during counts of birds at sea

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: South African Journal of Marine Science
    Simultaneous transect counts of seabirds by pairs of experienced, ship-based observers were compared to estimate count precision, defined as the proportion of birds counted by both observers. Precision was low; at most 51 per cent for all birds combined, with...
  7. Seabird consumption and production in the Benguela and Western Agulhas ecosystems

    Seabird consumption and production in the Benguela and Western Agulhas ecosystems

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: South African Journal of Marine Science
    Seabirds were estimated to consume about 430 000 metric tons of food per annum off south-western Africa (15°S to 28°E, from the coast to the 500 m bottom contour) in the 1980s. Of this some 34 per cent was eaten...
  8. BIOLOGY OF THE TRISTAN THRUSH <em>NESOCICHLA EREMITA</em>

    BIOLOGY OF THE TRISTAN THRUSH <em>NESOCICHLA EREMITA</em>

    Item type: Journal Article • Journal: Ostrich: Journal of African Ornithology
    M.W. Fraser, P.G. Ryan, W.R.J. Dean, D.J. Briggs, & C.L. Moloney 1994. The biology of the Tristan Thrush Nesocichla eremita. Ostrich 65:14-25.