Brief reports

Perceived organisational support influences on job satisfaction and organisational commitment among junior academic staff members

Published in: Journal of Psychology in Africa
Volume 25, issue 4, 2015, pages: 364–366
DOI: 10.1080/14330237.2015.1078102
Author(s): Fumani Donald MabasaDepartment of Business Management, South Africa, Hlanganipai NgirandeDepartment of Human Resource Management, South Africa

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between perceived organisational support, employee job satisfaction and organisational commitment among junior academic staff of a South African higher education institution (N =70; female = 41 .4%; masters qualification = 85 .7%). Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire on organisational perceptions, commitment and job satisfaction. Correlations investigated whether there were any relationships between variables. T-tests and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were also used to examine whether participants perceived organisational support differently based on their demographics. Results showed a significant and positive relationship among employee perceptions of support from their organisation, their level of job satisfaction and level of organisational commitment. Male academic staff showed higher levels of perceived organisational support, employee job satisfaction and organisational commitment than females. Gendered work participation appears to explain aspects of work participation in the context of the South African higher education sector.

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