Appropriate Technology: Technological Innovation to Empower Africa

Posted 18 January 2016 by NISC under Announcements & Notices • Journal: African Journal of Science, Technology, Innovation and Development
Appropriate Technology: Technological Innovation to Empower Africa

The African Journal of Science, Technology, Innovation and Development’s special issue, “Appropriate Technology: Technological Innovation to Empower Africa” is devoted to nine of the best research presentations from the 6th International Conference on Appropriate Technology (ICAT).

These nine papers reflect a good cross-section of research presented at the conference, with authors from Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Saudi Arabia, the Sudan, the United States, and Zimbabwe. The theme of the conference, “Appropriate Technology for the 21st Century: Technological Innovation to Empower Africa” served to highlight the importance of innovation in advancing technology in general and appropriate technology in particular.

Appropriate Technology is technology that is culturally sensitive yet ecologically sound and economically sustainable. In the Editors’ note, John Trimble and Mammo Muchie outline that to fully embrace Appropriate Technology, one must be driven by compassion for humankind and Mother Earth and philosophically rooted in the belief that humanism, collectivism and egalitarianism are abiding human characteristics that heighten a collection conscience across society globally. One should be committed to organising for Appropriate Technology to replace unproductive and military driven technologies.

Researchers from Kenyatta University and Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology prepared a paper on the impact of rainfall variability on groundwater levels in a Kenyan municipality while authors from Saudi Arabia and the Sudan researched the use of technology in a water treatment process. A team from University of KwaZulu-Natal and Rhodes University, both in South Africa, conducted highly technical research on biocatalytic conversion of inulin and sucrose into short chain oligosaccharides for potential pharmaceutical applications. 

These three papers are available for a limited free access period (until the end of February 2016) by clicking on their respective titles here: 

1.    Impact of rainfall variability on groundwater levels in Ruiru municipality, Kenya. R.M. Nyakundi, M. Makokha, J.K. Mwangi.

2.    The use of technology in a water treatment process. Magdi Osman Ali, Abdalrasol J. Alzubaidi. 

3.   Biocatalytic conversion of unulin and sucrose into short chain oligosaccharides for potential pharmaceutical applications. Taurai Mutanda, Brendan S. Wilhelmi, Chris G. Whiteley. 

See more information about this journal here.

 

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